The Blue

November 22, 2018

 

In my opinion...

 

It took me several chapters to get into this book. There seemed to be a great deal of scene and historical setting, which I ended up skimming through, wanting to get to the real story.

 

            I’m glad I persevered though, as once it got going I found the story both intriguing, and about a subject I had never considered previously. I was aware of  the colour 'Sevres blue' but never ‘Blue’ or the role of the Huguenots of Spitalfields.

 

            Bilyeau’s characters are sympathetically developed, and I liked that, in spite of the era and her position, Genevieve was shown as a woman of strength with her own opinions.

 

            There were no real surprises in the story, but it was very enjoyable. It is written in a visual way, and I could imagine it being a successful film with its vivid descriptions and varied locations.

 

For other reviews have a look at https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/40121191.

 

If you would like to read the book yourself, Endeavour Media have 10 signed copies of The Blue up for grabs in a Goodreads giveaway, ending 1st December! Here is the link to enter: https://www.goodreads.com/giveaway/show/284490.

 

 

Want to know more?

 

In eighteenth century London, porcelain is the most seductive of commodities; fortunes are made and lost upon it. Kings do battle with knights and knaves for possession of the finest pieces and the secrets of their manufacture.

For Genevieve Planché, an English-born descendant of Huguenot refugees, porcelain holds far less allure; she wants to be an artist, a painter of international repute, but nobody takes the idea of a female artist seriously in London. If only she could reach Venice.

When Genevieve meets the charming Sir Gabriel Courtenay, he offers her an opportunity she can’t refuse; if she learns the secrets of porcelain, he will send her to Venice. But in particular, she must learn the secrets of the colour blue…

The ensuing events take Genevieve deep into England’s emerging industrial heartlands, where not only does she learn about porcelain, but also about the art of industrial espionage.

With the heart and spirit of her Huguenot ancestors, Genevieve faces her challenges head on, but how much is she willing to suffer in pursuit and protection of the colour blue?

 

 

My rating 

 

A satisfied 4 glasses of historical intrigue

 

 

 

Thank you Endeavour Media for asking me to join in this Blog Tour

 

 

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